Just me

Hey! It would be nice to get to know you. Send me a message if you want. I'm a tumblr parasite, but you will find here a lot of fandom posts from really talented people. As you probably guessed I am not a native speaker.
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stunningpicture:

I took a panoramic photo at a concert and lights changed in the middle of it. This is the result

stunningpicture:

I took a panoramic photo at a concert and lights changed in the middle of it. This is the result

hqlines:

Cleaning my room be like

image

relahvant:

I sometimes wish I was really famous but then I remember I’d have to be a role model and I’m always really really inappropriate at the wrong times so probably best I stay irrelevant to the world

did-you-kno:

A man once bought a $45 set of photograph negatives from a garage sale. They turned out to be original Ansel Adams works and are valued at $200 million.
Source

did-you-kno:

A man once bought a $45 set of photograph negatives from a garage sale. They turned out to be original Ansel Adams works and are valued at $200 million.

Source

lunchtrae:

stardust-seedling:

Fibonacci, the structure of our world.

I cant stop looking at it

lunchtrae:

stardust-seedling:

Fibonacci, the structure of our world.

I cant stop looking at it

Franz Kafka, the story goes, encountered a little girl in the park where he went walking daily. She was crying. She had lost her doll and was desolate.

Kafka offered to help her look for the doll and arranged to meet her the next day at the same spot. Unable to find the doll he composed a letter from the doll and read it to her when they met.

"Please do not mourn me, I have gone on a trip to see the world. I will write you of my adventures." This was the beginning of many letters. When he and the little girl met he read her from these carefully composed letters the imagined adventures of the beloved doll. The little girl was comforted.

When the meetings came to an end Kafka presented her with a doll. She obviously looked different from the original doll. An attached letter explained: “my travels have changed me… “

Many years later, the now grown girl found a letter stuffed into an unnoticed crevice in the cherished replacement doll. In summary it said: “every thing that you love, you will eventually lose, but in the end, love will return in a different form.”

May Benatar, Kafka and the Doll: The Pervasiveness of Loss

For me there are two wise lessons in this story: Grief and loss are ubiquitous even for a young child. And the way toward healing is to look for how love comes back in another form. - May Benatar

(via maybeyouinspireme)

vinegod:

Narrating People’s Lives: On the Sidewalk! by Thomas Sanders

adayinthelesbianlife:

— I Want a President, by Zoe Leonard

adayinthelesbianlife:

I Want a President, by Zoe Leonard